Rivers of Red Ice on Europa 
The folks at JPL just published a new image of the surface of Europa – Jupiter’s watery, chaotic, eruptive, and potentially life-harboring satellite. The photograph illustrates the contrast between the moon’s relatively pure water ice (blue-white terrain) and its saltier, and thereby ruddier, surface ice.
According to JPL, the image area measures approximately 101 by 103 miles (163 km by 167 km), and is composited from photographs captured by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft in the late nineties. High-res

Rivers of Red Ice on Europa

The folks at JPL just published a new image of the surface of Europa – Jupiter’s watery, chaotic, eruptive, and potentially life-harboring satellite. The photograph illustrates the contrast between the moon’s relatively pure water ice (blue-white terrain) and its saltier, and thereby ruddier, surface ice. According to JPL, the image area measures approximately 101 by 103 miles (163 km by 167 km), and is composited from photographs captured by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft in the late nineties.

Source io9.com

Double Red Rainbow at Sunset

Captured at sunset on April 27th, 2014 by Manolis Thravalos from Samos Island, Greece, the sun was behind the camera. The list of optical phenomena is substantial: rainbows, red-tinted sunsets, and brightened sky within the bow.

Rainbows are formed when light catches raindrops just right for a million tiny prisms, splitting the white light into an arc of colour. The raindrops don’t just split the light into rainbows; a portion is also directly reflected. This creates a brightened area below the primary bow. Rayleigh scattering through thicker atmosphere around the horizon means we only see the longest wavelengths, tinting the entire rainbow into sunset reds. High-res

Double Red Rainbow at Sunset

Captured at sunset on April 27th, 2014 by Manolis Thravalos from Samos Island, Greece, the sun was behind the camera. The list of optical phenomena is substantial: rainbows, red-tinted sunsets, and brightened sky within the bow. Rainbows are formed when light catches raindrops just right for a million tiny prisms, splitting the white light into an arc of colour. The raindrops don’t just split the light into rainbows; a portion is also directly reflected. This creates a brightened area below the primary bow. Rayleigh scattering through thicker atmosphere around the horizon means we only see the longest wavelengths, tinting the entire rainbow into sunset reds.

Source space.io9.com

The Spitzer Space Telescope explores the skies in a wavelength we’re blind to, sensing the heat of infrared. After 3,925 days of service, it’s had plenty of time to built up an impressive gallery. Now continued funding is in jeopardy, it’s a good time to look back on the gorgeous images of science.

Source space.io9.com

Spirit & Opportunity: 10 Years Roving Across Mars

This exhibition celebrates the amazing images and achievements of the two Mars Exploration Rovers on the 10th anniversary of their landings on the Red Planet.

The twin Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity were launched toward Mars in the summer of 2003. Spirit arrived on January 3, 2004, and Opportunity on January 24, 2004.

Spirit traveled 7.7 kilometers (4.8 miles) over more than six years. Opportunity has traveled more than 38 kilometers (23.6 miles) over an ongoing mission that has reached 10 years.

Source airandspace.si.edu


[The image] shows the solar eclipse earlier this month as covered and uncovered by several different solar observatories. The innermost image shows the Sun in ultraviolet light as recorded over a few hours by the SWAP instrument aboard the PROBA2 mission in a sun-synchronous low Earth orbit. This image is surrounded by a ground-based eclipse image, reproduced in blue, taken from Gabon. Further out is a circularly blocked region used to artificially dim the central sun by the LASCO instrument aboard the Sun-orbiting SOHO spacecraft. The outermost image — showing the outflowing solar corona — was taken by LASCO ten minutes after the eclipse and shows an outflowing solar corona. Over the past few weeks, our Sun has been showing an unusually high amount of sunspots, CMEs, and flares — activity that was generally expected as the Sun is currently going through Solar Maximum — the busiest part of its 11 year solar cycle. The above resultant image is a picturesque montage of many solar layers at once that allows solar astronomers to better match up active areas on or near the Sun’s surface with outflowing jets in the Sun’s corona.
High-res
[The image] shows the solar eclipse earlier this month as covered and uncovered by several different solar observatories. The innermost image shows the Sun in ultraviolet light as recorded over a few hours by the SWAP instrument aboard the PROBA2 mission in a sun-synchronous low Earth orbit. This image is surrounded by a ground-based eclipse image, reproduced in blue, taken from Gabon. Further out is a circularly blocked region used to artificially dim the central sun by the LASCO instrument aboard the Sun-orbiting SOHO spacecraft. The outermost image — showing the outflowing solar corona — was taken by LASCO ten minutes after the eclipse and shows an outflowing solar corona. Over the past few weeks, our Sun has been showing an unusually high amount of sunspots, CMEs, and flares — activity that was generally expected as the Sun is currently going through Solar Maximum — the busiest part of its 11 year solar cycle. The above resultant image is a picturesque montage of many solar layers at once that allows solar astronomers to better match up active areas on or near the Sun’s surface with outflowing jets in the Sun’s corona.

Source io9.com